November 24, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 – B1049.6 | Starlink v1.0 L15

Launch window: 0213 UTC 11/25 (2113 EST)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, USA

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 16th batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink V1.0-L15. The Falcon 9 rocket booster being used is B1049, and will be it’s 7th time reused. This will possibly mark SpaceX’s first 7th launched and landed Falcon 9 rocket booster.


November 19, 2020 – Mission Success

Rocket Lab | Electron | Return to Sender

Launch window: 0144-0434, 11/20 UTC (2044-2334 EST)
Launch site: Launch Complex 1, Māhia Peninsula, NZ

Rocket Lab’s Electron launch vehicle will loft 30 satellites to a sun-synchronous orbit at 500 km altitude for a range of customers, including TriSept, Unseenlabs, Swarm, Auckland Programme for Space Systems, and global gaming software company Valve. The satellites span a range of operations, from TriSept’s tech demonstration of new tether systems designed to accelerate spacecraft reentry and reduce orbital debris, through to the next generation of maritime surveillance satellites for Unseenlabs, as well as communications satellites for Swarm. The mission will also deploy New Zealand’s first student-built satellite, the APSS-1 satellite for Te Pūnaha Ātea – Auckland Space Institute at The University of Auckland. The 14-day launch window is scheduled to open on November 20 UTC.


November 15, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 – B1061 | Crew-1

Launch window: 0027 UTC 11/16 (1927 EST)
Launch site: LC-39A, NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on its first operational flight with astronauts on-board to the International Space Station. NASA astronauts Mike Hopkins, Victor Glover and Shannon Walker, and Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi will launch on the Crew Dragon spacecraft. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea.


November 13, 2020 – Mission Success

ULA | Atlas V 531 | NROL-101

Launch window: 2232 UTC (1732 EST)
Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, USA

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket will launch a classified spacecraft payload for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The rocket will fly in the 531 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, three solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. The mission was changed from an earlier planned “551” configuration. This will be the first launch of an Atlas 5 rocket with new Northrop Grumman-built GEM-63 solid rocket motors, replacing the Aerojet Rocketdyne AJ-60A solid rocket motors used on previous Atlas Vs


November 5, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 – B1062.1 | GPS III SV04 (Sacagawea)

Launch window: 2324-2339 UTC (1824-1839 EST)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, USA

SpaceX is to launch a Falcon 9 rocket (B1062) for the U.S. Air Force’s fourth 3rd-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System (GPS). The satellite is manufactured by Lockheed Martin.


October 28, 2020 – Mission Success

Rocket Lab | Electron | In Focus

Launch window: 2114-2203 UTC (1714-1803 EDT)
Launch site: LC-1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand

A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch on its 15th flight with the CE-SAT-2B Earth-imaging microsatellite for Canon Electronics and nine SuperDove Earth-imaging nanosatellites for Planet. Rocket Lab nicknamed the launch “In Focus” in reference to the Earth observation payloads on the mission.


October 24, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 – B1060.3 | Starlink L14

Launch window: 1531 UTC (1131 EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, USA

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 15th batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink V1.0-L14. The Falcon 9 rocket booster being used is B1060, and will be it’s 3rd time reused.


October 18, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 – B1051.6 | Starlink L13

Launch window: 1227 UTC (0827 EDT)
Launch site: SLC-39A, NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 14th batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink L13. The Falcon 9 rocket booster being used is B1051, and will be the 2nd Falcon 9 by SpaceX to mark 6 times reused.


October 6, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 | Starlink L12

Launch window: 1129-1144 UTC (0729-0744 EDT)
Launch site: LC-39A, NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA

A SpaceX Falcon 9 B1058.3 rocket will launch the 13th batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink L12. This will mark the 3rd time this rocket booster has been used since Bob & Doug’s DM-2 test flight.


September 12, 2020 – Mission Failed

Astra | Rocket 3.1 | Test Flight

Launch window: 0200-0430 UTC (2200-0030/11th EDT)
Launch site: Pacific Spaceport Complex, Kodiak Island, Alaska, USA

An Astra rocket, Rocket 3.1, will launch from Astra’s Kodiak Launch Site (pad LP-3B at Pacific Spaceport Complex – Alaska (PSCA) on Kodiak Island). This is a demonstration mission, and therefore Rocket 3.1 will not have a payload. If Rocket 3.1 does make it to orbit, the vehicle will send an electronic signal that simulates the deployment of a satellite.


September 3, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 | Starlink L11

Launch window: 1246 UTC (0846 EDT)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket (B1060.2) will launch the 12th batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink L11.


August 31, 2020 – Mission Success

Rocket Lab | Electron | I Can’t Believe It’s Not Optical

Launch window: 0305-0705 UTC (2305/30th-0305 EDT)
Launch site: LC-1, Māhia Peninsula, New Zealand

A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch on its 14th flight with the Sequoia radar observation satellite for Capella Space, a commercial remote sensing company. Rocket Lab nicknamed the launch “I Can’t Believe It’s Not Optical” in reference to Capella’s synthetic aperture radar technology.


August 30, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 | SAOCOM 1B

Launch window: 2318 UTC (1918 EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch (B1059.4) the SAOCOM 1B satellite for CONAE, Argentina’s space agency. SAOCOM 1B is the second of two SAOCOM 1-series Earth observation satellites designed to provide radar imagery to help emergency responders and monitor the environment, including the collection of soil moisture measurements.


August 18, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 | Starlink L10 / SkySats 19-21

Launch window: 1431 UTC (1031 EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch 58 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 10 and 11th launch. Three SkySat Earth-imaging satellites for Planet will launch as rideshare payloads on this mission.


August 15, 2020 – Mission Success

Arianespace | Ariane 5 | Galaxy 30, MEV 2 & BSat 4b VA253

Launch window: 2204-2216 UTC (1804-1816 EDT)
Launch site: Ariane Launch Area-3, Kourou, French Guiana

Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA253, to launch the Galaxy 30 communications satellite, the second Mission Extension Vehicle satellite servicing spacecraft, and the BSat 4b broadcasting payload. Galaxy 30 is owned by Intelsat, and will provide video and television broadcast services over the United States. Galaxy 30 also hosts a navigation augmentation payload for the Federal Aviation Administration to support civilian air travel. MEV 2 is the second robotic servicing vehicle for Space Logistics LLC, and will dock with the Intelsat 1002 communications satellite in geostationary orbit to extend its commercial life. BSat 4b will provide direct-to-home 4K and 8K ultra HD broadcast services over Japan and neighboring regions for the Japanese operator B-SAT. Galaxy 30 and MEV 2 were built by Northrop Grumman, and BSat 4b was manufactured by Maxar.


August 7, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 | Starlink L9/BlackSky Global 5 & 6

Launch window: 0512-0527 UTC (0112-0127 EDT)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launch is expected to launch the tenth batch of approximately 57 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 9. Two Earth observation microsatellites for BlackSky Global, a Seattle-based company, will launch as rideshare payloads on this mission.


July 30, 2020 – Mission Success

ULA | Atlas V 541 | Mars 2020

Launch window: 1150-1350 UTC (0750-0950 EDT)
Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V 541 rocket launch will lift off NASA’s Perseverance rover to Mars. The spacecraft will explore the Jezero Crater to study the planet’s habitability, seek signs of past microbial life, collect and store samples of selected rock and soil and prepare for future human missions.

The rover also carries the Ingenuity helicopter, a technology demonstration to prove that powered flight can be achieved at Mars.


July 20, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 | ANASIS-II

Launch window: 2130-0055 July 14/15 UTC (1730-2055 EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is to launch the ANASIS-II, or KMilSatCom-1, built by Airbus Defense and Space. A communications satellite for the South Korean military.


July 4, 2020 – Mission Failed

Rocket Lab | Electron | Pics Or It Didn’t Happen

Launch window: 2113 UTC (1713 EDT)
Launch site: Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand

A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch on its 13th flight on a rideshare mission. The Electron rocket will carry the CE-SAT-IB Earth-imaging satellite for Canon Electronics, five SuperDove Earth observation CubeSats for Planet, and the Faraday 1 CubeSat for In-Space Missions. Rocket Lab nicknamed the launch “Pics Or It Didn’t Happen.”

Failed to Reach Orbit – The issue occurred approximately four minutes into the flight on July 4, 2020 and resulted in the safe loss of the vehicle. As a result, the payloads onboard Electron were not deployed to orbit. Electron remained within the predicted launch corridors and caused no harm to personnel or the launch site. Rocket Lab is working closely with the FAA to investigate the anomaly and identify its root cause to correct the issue to move forward.

– Rocket Lab

June 30, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 | GPS III SV03

Launch window: 2010 UTC (1610 EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launch will lift off the U.S. Air Force’s third third-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. The satellite is built by Lockheed Martin. The Air Force previously planned to launch the second GPS 3-series satellite on this mission.


June 11, 2020 – Mission Success

Launch window: 0544-0632 UTC (0043-0232 EDT)
Launch site: LC-1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand

Rocekt Lab | Electron | Don’t Stop Me Now

A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launch will lift off on its 12th flight on a rideshare mission. The rocket will carry three payloads into orbit for the National Reconnaissance Office, the U.S. government’s spy satellite agency, and the ANDESITE CubeSat for Boston University and NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative, which will study Earth’s magnetosphere and Space Weather. The M2 Pathfinder satellite, a collaboration between the Australian government and the University of New South Wales Canberra Space, will also be launched on a communications and technology demonstration mission.


June 13, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 | Starlink L8 / SkySats 16-18

Launch window: 0921-0952 UTC (0521-0552 EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launch is expected to launch the ninth batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 8. Three SkySat Earth-imaging satellites for Planet will launch as rideshare payloads on this mission.


June 3, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 | Starlink L7

Launch window: 2055-2156 UTC (8:55-9:56 p.m. EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is expected to launch the eighth batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 7.


May 30, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 | Crew Dragon Demo 2

Launch window: 1922 UTC (3:22 p.m. EDT)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on its first test flight with astronauts on-board to the International Space Station under the auspices of NASA’s commercial crew program. NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken will fly on the Demo-2 mission. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea.


May 17, 2020 – Mission Success (139th)

ULA | Atlas V 501 | USSF7/OTV6

Launch window: 1314 UTC (9:14 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the USSF 7 mission, formerly known as AFSPC 7, for the U.S. Space Force. The mission’s primary payload is the X-37B, a spaceplane also called the Orbital Test Vehicle, on the program’s sixth mission. The rocket will fly in the 501 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage.

April 22, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 | Starlink L6

Launch window: 1930 UTC (3:30 p.m. EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is expected to launch the seventh batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 6.


April 9, 2020

ROSCOSMOS | Soyuz | ISS 62S

Launch window: 0805 UTC (4:05 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the crewed Soyuz MS-16 spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. The rocket will fly in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration.


March 26, 2020 – Mission Success

ULA | Atlas V | AEHF 6

Launch window: 1857 – 2057 UTC (2:57 – 4:57 p.m. EST)
Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

The Atlas V rocket will fly in a 551 configuration. 5 meter Fairing, 5 Solid Rocket Boosters, and 1 Centaur upper stage.

A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the sixth Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) satellite. Built by Lockheed Martin, this U.S. military spacecraft will provide highly-secure communications. The rocket will fly in the 551 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, five solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage.


March 18, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 | Starlink 5

Launch window: 1216 UTC (8:16a.m. EST)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is expected to launch the sixth batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 5. Early engine shutdown during ascent. B1048.5 did not make landing.


March 6/7, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 | CRS-20

Launch window:  0450 UTC (11:50 p.m. EST)
Launch site:  SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

CRS-20 is the 20th resupply mission to the International Space Station from NASA commercial cargo provider SpaceX.

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 22nd Dragon spacecraft mission on its 20th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA.


February 17, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 | Starlink 4

Launch window:  1505 UTC (10:05 a.m. EST)
Launch site:  SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is expected to launch the fifth batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 4.


February 9/10, 2020 – Mission Success

ULA | Atlas 5 411 | Solar Orbiter

Launch window: 0403-0625 UTC (11:03p.m.-1:25a.m. EST)
Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-087, will launch the Solar Orbiter spacecraft for NASA and the European Space Agency. Built by Airbus Defense and Space, Solar Orbiter, or SolO, will travel inside the orbit of Mercury to study how the sun creates and controls the heliosphere, the vast bubble of charged particles blown by the solar wind into the interstellar medium. The rocket will fly in the 411 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, one solid rocket booster and a single-engine Centaur upper stage.


January 30/31, 2020 – Mission Success

Rocket Lab | Electron Birds of a Feather | NROL-151

Launch window: 0000 – 0400 UTC, 31st (7:00 – 11:00p.m. EST, 30th )
Launch site: LC-1, Mahia Peninsula, NZ

Rocket Lab’s 11th Electron flight – Birds of a Feather – will launch a dedicated mission for the United States National Reconnaissance Office (NRO). The launch window is scheduled to open on 31 January NZDT and the mission will lift off from Rocket Lab Launch Complex 1.

The NRO competitively awarded the contract under the Rapid Acquisition of a Small Rocket (RASR) contract vehicle. RASR allows the NRO to explore new launch opportunities that can provide a streamlined, commercial approach for getting small satellites into space.


January 29, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 B1051.3 | Starlink-3

Launch window: 1406 UTC (9:06a.m. EST)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is expected to launch the fourth batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 3. 


January 19, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 | Crew Dragon In-Flight Abort Test (IFA)

Launch window: 1300-1700 UTC (8:00a.m – 2:00p.m)
Launch site: SLC-39A, NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida

SpaceX will configure Crew Dragon to trigger a launch escape shortly after liftoff and demonstrate Crew Dragon’s capability to safely separate from the Falcon 9 rocket in the unlikely event of an in-flight emergency. The demonstration also will provide valuable data toward NASA certifying SpaceX’s crew transportation system for carrying astronauts to and from the International Space Station.


January 16, 2020 – Mission Success

ArianeSpace | Ariane 5 | Eutelsat Konnect / GSAT 30

Launch window: 2105-2300 UTC (4:05-6:00 p.m. EST)
Launch site: ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana

Arianespace to launch an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, dubbed VA251, to lift the Eutelsat Konnect and GSAT 30 communications satellites. The Eutelsat Konnect satellite (Eutelsat BB4A) will give broadband Internet services to Africa. An all-electric Eutelsat Konnect spacecraft is the first built satellite from the new Spacebus Neo platform by Thales Alenia Space. The GSAT 30 satellite is for communications services by the Indian Space Research Organization.


January 6/7, 2020 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 | Starlink 2

Launch window: 0219 UTC (9:19 p.m. EST)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is expected to launch the third batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 2.


December 26, 2019 – Mission Success

Russian Gov’t | Rockot | Gonets M

Launch window: 2312 UTC ( 6:12 p.m. EST)
Launch site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

A Russian government Rockot vehicle with a Breeze KM upper stage will launch three Gonets M communications satellites.


December 24, 2019 – Mission Success

Russian Gov’t | Proton | Elektro-L 3

Launch window: 1203 UTC (7:03 a.m. EST)
Launch site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

A Russian government Proton rocket and Block DM upper stage will launch the Elektro-L 3 geostationary weather satellite.


December 20, 2019 – Partial Success

ULA | Atlas 5 N22 | CST-100 Starliner Orbital Flight Test

Launch window:  1136 UTC (6:36 a.m. EST)
Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

The Starliner Orbital Flight Test will be the 81st launch of the Atlas V and will mark ULA’s 136th mission.

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket will deliver the CST-100 Starliner spacecraft to a 98 nautical mile sub-orbital trajectory on its Orbital Flight Test (OFT) to the International Space Station. After Starliner separation from Atlas V, Starliner engines will burn taking it the rest of the way to orbit and on to the International Space Station.


December 18, 2019 – Mission Success

ArianeSpace | Soyuz | CSG & CHEOPS

Launch window:  0854 UTC (3:54 a.m. EST)
Launch site: ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana

A Soyuz rocket, assigned VS23, will launch from Guiana Space Center in South America. It will hold the first COSMO-SkyMed Second Generation(CSG 1) radar surveillance satellite for the Italian space agency (ASI). European Space Agency’s Characterizing Exoplanet Satellite(CHEOPS) will take flight as a secondary payload. Built by Airbus Defense and Space in Spain with a Swiss-developed science instrument, CHEOPS will observe transits of planets around other stars to measure their radii. The rocket will be a Soyuz 2-1b (Soyuz ST-B) configuration and will use a Fregat upper stage.

December 16/17, 2019 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 | JCSAT 18/Kacific 1

Launch window:  0010-0138 UTC on 17th (7:10-8:38 p.m. EST on 16th)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the JCSAT 18/Kacific 1 communications satellite, jointly owned by SKY Perfect JSAT Corp. of Japan and Kacific Broadband Satellites of Singapore. Built by Boeing, the JCSAT 18/Kacific 1 communications satellite will provide mobile and broadband services across the Asia-Pacific region. UPDATE


December 10, 2019 – Mission Success

Roscosmos | Soyuz-2.1b | Glonass M

Launch window: 0830-1030 UTC (3:30-5:30 a.m. EST)
Launch site: Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia

Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch Glonass M, a global navigation satellite. This will be conducted on a Soyuz-2.1b configuration rocket with a Fregat upper stage.


December 6, 2019 – Mission Success

Roscosmos | Soyuz-2.1a | Progress 74P

Launch window: 0934 UTC (4:34 a.m. EST)
Launch site:  Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

The R-7, commonly known as the Soyuz rocket that is capable of launching about 7.5 tons into low Earth orbit (LEO).

A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the 74th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station.


December 6, 2019 – Mission Success

Rocket Lab | Electron | Running Out Of Fingers

Launch window: 0756 UTC (2:56 a.m. EST)
Launch site: Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand HighlightRunning Out Of Fingers will be Rocket Lab’s 10th (tenth) Electron mission since the company’s first launch in May 2017.

Rideshare Mission: Several PocketQube spacecraft from manufacturer and mission management provider, Alba Orbital. These six nanosatellites represent five countries and a range of technology demonstrations. Including: LEO-to-LEO inter-satellite link capabilities which are crucial to creating real-time global communications constellations; also a payload built by university students in Hungary which is to measure human-made electromagnetic pollution; and a tester of new thermal isolation material for use in space.

Running Out Of Fingers‘ will also include the first guided, full telemetry re-entry of the Electron launch vehicle’s first stage. This is part of Rocket Lab’s plans to re-use and re-fly rocket boosters in future missions.


December 5, 2019 – Mission Success

SpaceX | Falcon 9 | CRS 19

Launch window: 1729 UTC (12:29 p.m. EST)
Launch site:  SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

CRS-19 is the 19th resupply mission to the International Space Station from NASA commercial cargo provider SpaceX.

SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft will be filled with supplies and payloads including critical materials to directly support dozens of the more than 250 science and research investigations that will occur during Expeditions 61 and 62. In addition to bringing research to station, the Dragon’s unpressurized trunk will transport the Japanese Space Agency’s (JAXA) Hyperspectral Imager Suite (HISUI), a next-generation, hyperspectral Earth imaging system.